The Photography of Modernist Cuisine

With Heston Blumenthal being awarded another Michelin star for his restaurant, it seems like there’s no better time for art, food and science. This month sees the release of ‘The Photography of Modernist Cuisine‘ by Nathan Myhrvold, the author’s 3rd book, which looks at the art and science of cooking.

Taking photographs of a meal using Instagram is a far cry from these cross-sections of the insides of pressure cookers and saucepans and macro shots of fruits and fish. What I think is great about this book is the mere size of the photographs. Each double page spread measures at 26″ x 16.3″, much bigger than any lavish cookbook or Donna Hay magazine.

The close up images remind me of Edward Quigley’s six peas in a pod or Irving Penn’s Still Lives for Vogue, where the images are art photographs with food as the subject, observing the beauty and form of each item. Like Carl Warner doing creative things with food by building landscapes, this book uses food in a different, yet exciting way; the cut away pans are something new altogether! The perspective is completely different to anything seen before, especially in food photography. Advancements in food science and technology have allowed the photographer to capture what is happening inside a boiling hot saucepan – this definitely isn’t something we’d have seen in an 18th century still life painting.

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  1. Pingback: Cut-away cross sections of food by photographer Beth Galton | The History of Food Photography

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